WILLIAM HAMILTON (2 JUNE 1939 – 8 APRIL 2016)

Cover

BackCover

This book is copyright 1974 by Chronicle Books, San Francisco, CA

So, who is William Hamilton?

As usual, Wikipedia has a decent page on him.  The article mentions that he sold his first cartoon to “The New Yorker” in 1965.  At that time he was in the Army.

In the above book, he talks about some of the questions he has been asked.

          QuestionsTopQuestionsBottom

For those of us wondering what it is like to work at “The New Yorker,” there is an interesting review of a book, “The Receptionist” written by a long time receptionist, Janet Groth, at the New Yorker.  The review, by Mae Anderson, of the Associated Press, was published July 29, 2012 in the Portland Oregon, “Oregonian,” The book (320 pages long) is published by Algonquin Books.  The review mentions Groth saying that she was seduced and then abandoned by a cartoonist.  Hopefully, not the cartoonist of this blog.  Since that time Groth says she has learned to avoid cartoonists, and has found lasting love.  Awaaa.  Here is the article, courtesy of the “Oregonian.”

ReceptionistInterview

And speaking of the “New Yorker,”  in a publication entitled “The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker”, The Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Inc. 151 West 19th Street, New York, NY 10011, copyright 2004, we find 29 of his cartoons, the first one in 1967.  The date differs from the Wikipedia date for the first cartoon, however I will not get in the middle of that discussion.  First, the 1967 cartoon.

NewYorker1967

And then, the 2003 cartoon.

NewYorker2003

People” magazine, volume 12, number 8, August 20, 1979 has an in-depth article (People??)  about the 40 year old Hamilton, in which he talks about his brief marriage, and an almost shotgun wedding.  The article ends with the following:

Recently Bill Hamilton celebrated his 40th birthday with a gala party at Ethelwild. It recalled an earlier and particularly convivial evening he loves to describe. He was driving home when suddenly he realized he was bracketed by two police cars. Thinking fast, he slammed on the brakes and jumped out, shouting, “Help! Help! I’m drunk!” The startled and amused state troopers thereupon drove him home without even giving him a ticket. His mother heard him at the front door, urging the cops to come in. He wanted to read them his latest play.

Well worth a look to read the whole article.

The “New York Sun” of January 2005 has a nice article summarizing his life up to that time, with emphasis  on his Off-Broadway show, ”White Chocolate.”  The article also mentions his second marriage:

He recently married a Kentucky horse breeder, which has put him in comfortable financial circumstances. He’d like them to buy an apartment in New York, but she’d rather own a private plane.

We should all have that quandary.

While the “Sun” gives nice review the “Talkin’ Broadway,” which  is some type of on-line volunteer group dealing with the theater scene is not as kind.  Maybe if Hamilton had dropped a few ‘g’s’ it might have helped.

Dan Bacalzo, in a December 1969 review in “Theater Mania” is somewhat kinder..

From 1988 interview in “The New York Times” we have:

Although he is a novelist, essayist, radio commentator and playwright, Mr. Hamilton is best known for his distinctive drawings poking fun at the rich and self-satisfied.

His fascination with the horse-and-BMW set, he said, ”comes from being near money, but far enough away that I couldn’t quite get my fingers around it.”

Mr. Hamilton, 49 years old, was raised on a ranch in California’s Napa Valley. ”We lived on one of those dwindling trust funds with a hint of money in the past, but not much in the present.”

He became a cartoonist, he said, because ”the freelance life is the only way you can have an ersatz trust fund.” Indeed, to his dismay, he relies on the income from the drawings to support his other projects, which include a play scheduled to open in New York next spring.

”I’ve decided that in this day and age, artists and writers really have to be their own patrons,” he said.

The interview is either by Susan Cheever, or Michael Freitag, her name is at the start of the article, his at the end.  I mean no disrespect to either, but I am not certain who to credit, so they both get mentioned.

Here is a link to a nice collection of his cartoons, along with a photo of him.

And before I share some cartoons from the “Anti-Social Register”, I want to mention a great blog on his cartoons.  The Koshersamurai.

        The writer of the blog:

About the Kosher Samurai

Criminal Defence Lawyer.

Two kids (aka The Kiddie-Winkers):  Exhibit One (23 yr old daughter); Exhibit Two (20 yr old son)

Jewish. Italian. Love Japanese culture and history.

And now for some cartoons from Hamilton’s 1974 publication, “Anti-Social Register.”

ComingOut

I think that ‘coming out in 1974 had a different connotation than today.  However, the cartoon works either way.

MilitaryCluelesness

Obviously, from his Army days…

BlackExperience

How about some office cartoons,

AccountingPractices

Or,

TakeOneForTheCompanyAnd my favorite,

PovertyTaskForce

On to education, at least at least I think it is an educational setting,

Sexism

On to the Family at home,

AbortionQuestion

TrueHappiness

UrbanChristmasGifts

And a nice religious ending.

Religion

Well, William Hamilton.

Hope you enjoyed it.

Ted

PS

We have several updates on his life and times.

We appreciate all the contributations.  The first one:

http://michaelmaslin.com/inkspill/new-yorker-cartoonist-william-hamilton-1939-2016/

Then,

William Hamilton, Popular Cartoonist at The New Yorker, Dies in Car Crash

Then,

William Hamilton, Popular Cartoonist at The New Yorker, Dies in Car Crash

And,

William Hamilton, Popular Cartoonist at The New Yorker, Dies in Car Crash

As I said, I appreciate all the follow up comments.

thank you.

Ted

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About visualhumor

Enjoy viewing and collecting visual humor from around the world.
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13 Responses to WILLIAM HAMILTON (2 JUNE 1939 – 8 APRIL 2016)

  1. I’ve been a fan of William Hamilton for most of my life. I can’t say enough good things about him. Thank you, Ted, most kindly for mentioning me and my blog.

  2. alan shepp says:

    why haven;t we seen your cartoons lately in the New Yorker/

  3. Pingback: | Inkspill - New Yorker Cartoonists News

  4. Pingback: William Hamilton, Popular Cartoonist at The New Yorker, Dies in Car Crash - Castwb

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